VI pride and Pride in the VI should be combined: for the island's sake

Home Forum Community Specific St. Thomas and Water Island Environment VI pride and Pride in the VI should be combined: for the island's sake

This topic contains 2 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  MPepco 1 month, 1 week ago.

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  • #1869

    Duryan
    Participant

    It’s no secret that Virgin Islanders are proud to be born and raised in these beautiful lands. Who wouldn’t be? The Virgin islands offer amazing sites, beautiful cultures and a happy-hour-esque philosophy to life and its challenges. We can see the VI pride in the way we all back Rock City on the world stage or how we would cheer for Tim Duncan even if some of us weren’t Spurs fans. The pride exists and is strong and it also makes the people strong.

    But wouldn’t it also be nice to have the same pride for the islands themselves? The same strength to make a difference? What if we actively, as a community; ensure that these lands are being kept clean and beautiful? How do we do that? I’m fairly certain that campaigning about it doesn’t mean that it’ll change. Look at how many politicians have already in the past ran with this agenda just to abandon any true resolve after securing a position. More needs to be done than just talk… but what?

    *****( Drum roll)****
    Social Responsibility. Social responsibility is a duty every individual performs so as to maintain a balance between the economy and the ecosystems. Believe it or not our appearance is constantly being judged by outsiders. But that does not mean that the onus must always fall on the government to clean up the mess. Lest they sweep it under the philosophical and maybe even literal rug.

    As Caribbean people our pride should spill over into environmental issues as we aim to preserve the beauty of these islands and we do not have to wait for an ok- go ahead. We can foster social responsibility for the environment today. 3 easy steps can be followed.

    1) keep your community clean: if you see disturbing debris or garbage take it to a nearby dumpster. If you see a nearby dumpster overfilled reach out to waste management and ask that it be tended to

    2) Each one Teach one- Sometimes people may not be aware of the damage that garbage and waste can have on an ecosystem’s animals or an community’s people. Those who have that awareness should not let their voice be softened. Encourage as many people as much as you can to stop pollution and to practice environmental social responsibility. Our schools also have a big role to play in this awareness. As we raise the future it is important to instill social responsibility in our children so that they too may create innovative ideas to reduce pollution and preserve our homes.

    3) Create/Join Environmental organizations- It’s not hard to make your own cleanup crew. After Hurricanes Irma and Maria me and some friends came together to help clean yards from debris. We became closer as friends, we helped our community and we even got some incentive to continue. Joining an organization of like minded individuals can also benefit your own personal growth.

    Above all remember, change is not accomplished over night. Any significant growth is a result of trial error and pressure. We do have a voice and we should use it always.

    God Bless.

    #1951

    swilliams
    Participant

    Duryan, you are so right. You see the garbage strewn around and you wonder what folk are thinking. Much of what we have to offer those who live as well as visit is the natural beauty. As a community we need more involvement of the type you describe.

    Saw a FaceBook video of some clean up on the hill steps on St. Thomas. Some volunteers were working on that and I believe Budson had organized it. Here is a shout out to you, him and others who are making a real contribution.

    Yeah, its all about social responsibility and giving back to your community,

    #2049

    MPepco
    Participant

    There is an article by Darlan Brin I just read on the site about Magens Bay. The environmental problem he addresses is less obvious but the Magen’s Bay watershed run-off is destroying one of the island’s major environmental attractions. Magens needs to be protected at all cost. The guys who work at the beach are really trying to do a good job but Brin explains that its what is occurring on the hillside that undermines the ecology of the beach and its surrounding lands. Magens Bay itself can do little to address this. It requires government controls that limit what gets done on the hillsides.

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